Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation


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Lecture 31: Female Victorian Novelists

The book also gives special attention to women writers like Mary Robinson and Charlotte Smith, and Pearson notes that many female readers gravitated to books written by other women. It would have been helpful if Pearson had written about the publication history of this periodical and about its readership, since it is a resource that she calls about so frequently. The same is true for some of the lesser known books that she cites. For instance, the novel Emily by Henry Kept 63 is referred to on several occasions, so Pearson could have provided a plot summary and biographical sketch of its author.

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Although her focus is on fiction, she examines different categories of reading material, such as the Bible, scientific works, classical texts, foreign languages, and philosophy. The strongest sections of the book tend to be those dealing at some length with the work of a particular author. In some places, there are so many examples from different books joined together that the effect is rather dizzying, with not enough attention paid to chronology or to the differences between the texts.

While the term remains problematic, due to its unwavering concepts, women who have written themselves, i.


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These are problems, which simply cannot be adequately addressed by men as they can by women. In Voyage, Rhys presents the psychological issues of an absent parent and the trauma caused by a neglectful and nonchalant guardian, which undoubtedly reveals instances of some Freudian notions. Anna experiences illegal abortion, sex as commodity and infidelity. Rhys takes control of these undeniably real life issues and allows them to complicate the narrative and character situation in her fiction.

The female body is, as a result, treated as commodity or a medium in an exchange, of sorts. Anna meets and begins an affair with Walter, who consequently begins to take care of her financially. Of course, Anna has the means to financially support herself with her stage career and family inheritance; however in order to break away from male-produced literature bad habit to misconceive women roles in, an ounce of the equation must remain. Anna thus relies on Walter for financially and sexually until their affair comes to a halting end.

The experience, which Rhys portrays, stems from the dependency and portrayal of female experiences during late modernist times. In the realm of modern America, the phenomenon of race mixing between blacks and whites became more common than ever before. Ethel is single and self-employed, operating her own business.

Race, in many ways, especially in 19th and 20th century writing, gives an excuse for those non-white character; those struggling with their identity, to commit acts less British. I use this term British constructively, keeping in mind the notion that British ideals were of the norm in the commonwealth and beyond. Colored people were considered wild and exotic; and unambiguously sexual creatures.

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This concept, at least in an European perspective, is portrayed as early as the 19th century. Rochester becomes so disgusted by the vile wildness of the foreign creature; he locks her in the upstairs attic. This is, I argue, why Bertha can suffer from insanity. The creation of Jane Eyre and Anna Morgan are mere remnants of the constructions women were exposed to in the past. In Voyage, however, Rhys fails, whether purposely or not, to employ a feminine character, who embodies a strict British ideology, such as Jane Eyre. The feminine experience had already begun to flourish, and Jean Rhys, however controversially, delivered the rawest form of this experience at the time.

Jean Rhys takes into consideration detail and images, in which a man could never portray. Moreover, the abortion was completed with an indication of a new start for Anna. She beseeches women to write themselves into history, and alongside other feminist critics; she aims to create a new discourse; one that corrects the mistaken portrayal of women in male-dominated literature throughout previous centuries. The story is centered on an Antoinette Cosway, who is of creole royalty. Keith and Paula Cohen.

Women's Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation

Signs 1 : Gjurgjan, Ljiljana Ina. Pearson, Jacqueline. Cambridge University Press, Rhys, Jean. Voyage in the Dark, London: Penguin, Print Showalter, Elain. A Reader. Basingstoke: Macmillan, Sollors, Werner.

Additional Comments:

Oxford University Press, Spyra, Ania. I, Wollstonecraft, Mary. A Vindication of the Rights of Women. Renascence Editions. London: 72, Related Papers.


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    Remember me on this computer. Name of resource. Problem URL. Describe the connection issue. SearchWorks Catalog Stanford Libraries. Torrid zones : maternity, sexuality, and empire in eighteenth-century English narratives. Responsibility Felicity A. Physical description p.

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    Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation
    Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation
    Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation
    Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation
    Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation
    Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation
    Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation
    Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation

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